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Features : Fishing Report Last Updated: Jul 17, 2013 - 9:49:10 AM


Don't fish in a thunderstorm
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Jul 17, 2013 - 9:47:50 AM

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Severe thunderstorms continue to impact fishing. Not so much the fish (as they are biting pretty well) but the safety of anglers trying to catch them. Lighting is a dangerous thing and no fish is worth the risk of fishing in a thunderstorm. However, I did manage to get out and fish a couple of time this week. The water temperature is in the mid to upper eighty degree range. Finger mullet and shrimp (still a bit small) are abundant in the creeks (so the unusually high amounts of rain has not moved them out).  As such, Trout, Flounder and Redfish are in the creeks as well.  
On Saturday, my friend Donna Crocker joined me for a short (2 hour) fishing trip. We launched around 5 in the afternoon. Our plan was to run into the harbor and target Trout on deep water drops.  An approaching storm (on radar) changed our plans.  We decided to stay close to the boat landing just in the case the weather got bad.  Donna was using small finger mullet on a lead head jig and I was casting a Z-Man MinnowZ Bad Shad (which looks like a small finger mullet).  We cast our offerings to docks and submerged ledges. Trout, Flounder and Redfish were most cooperative.  After completing inshore slams (and checking the weather radar), we left the creek and moved to a shallow water flat. Water clarity on the flat was marginal, but we eventually found a small school of big Redfish.  I staked out the skiff and Donna cast a finger mullet ahead of the fish. It was maddening to watch the fish approach, examine and leave the tasty and delicious finger mullet. Rather than chase the fish, we stayed on the pin anchor and quietly waited for the fish to return. Our patience was rewarded. After 15 minutes or so, Donna set the hook on a 30+-inch Red. The fish made surprisingly long runs and it took Donna several minutes to bring it to the skiff.  After a quick picture, we took extra care to revive the Redfish after such an epic fight.  
Hopefully, the weather pattern will change soon.  In the interim, download a good radar application on your smartphone and check it often.  When you can safely get out, hungry fish will be waiting on you.
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